4 Reasons Why I Don’t Take Lactase Pills

When I tell people I’m lactose intolerant, many ask me why I don’t just pop a lactase pill and eat whatever I want. That’s a valid question.

First, let’s talk a little bit about lactase pills. The most popular brand available is Lactaid, but there are generic pills (CVS) and Nature’s Way pills. These pills are to be taken before eating the dairy-containing food and help you break it down so you do not have unpleasant side-effects. They are widely available at grocery stores and pharmacies and many people use them. So why don’t I?

lactase pills

1. They don’t fully eliminate my symptoms. The effectiveness of these pills depends on how much dairy you can naturally tolerate and how much dairy you consume. I have always had more mild after effects when I consume the pill, but it does not fully “fix” my stomach issues.

2. It’s a pain to have to pop a pill. Especially in a social setting. Imagine yourself sitting across your date, candles lighting up his/her eyes, romantic music playing in the background. He/she asks if you would like to share a cheesy appetizer and you can’t turn him down. The waiter interrupts your sweet conversation to bring your food. He/she looks at you, letting you take the first bite. Then you bite your lip and say, “Hold on” as you scrummage through your pocket/purse to find your Lactaid pill. You put the pill in your mouth as he/she is still watching— you are now feeling very awkward.  The mood is ruined.

3. They are kind of expensive. Lactaid goes for around $10 for 32 pills. This is about 31 cents a pill. Now, before you call me cheap, hear me out. When I have taken them, I have to take two pills. And that is for a “kind of” effect. I just don’t feel like spending money on something that is not going to give me what it promises on the label.

4. I am a black and white person. I can’t be going back and forth on being dairy-free. In order to stick with my decision, I need to stop consuming it completely, even if the pill helps me not feel so sick.

 

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  • http://www.hedgecombers.com Janie

    Interesting to read, I’m new to the intolerance (actually, I’ve had it since a child, I just always assumed it was IBS. How happy I am to have FINALLY figured it out!). Glad to read about your experience with the pills, as they don’t fully fix me either. But they do stop all pain and urgency (if you catch my drift!)
    Loving your blog, I’m learning loads!
    Janie x

    • Tash

      Oh do I catch your drift! ;) It’s ok, we can talk about these things on the blog. it’s MADE for it!

  • Donna Smith

    I am thrilled I just “happened” upon your blog! Thank you! I agree with all of your reasons for not popping the lactaid pills… Another reason I have for not taking them is that if my body is lactaid intolerant then a lactaid pill is not the cure, it simply camouflages the symptoms. Although the bloating and discomfort are reason enough to avoid dairy, what I cannot see or feel is the damage being done to my intestines by the constant inflamation… I gave up milkshakes and ice cream years ago, and have whittled away at saboteurs as my symptoms increased. Now, it is a lifestyle change. And I feel so much better when I am “on the wagon”. I have better days than others, and butter is def my down fall. Trying to keep a dairy free diet along with staying clear of processed foods (margarin) is, to say the least, difficult. Anyway, so glad I found you! I will be tuning in often!

    • Warstorm Trading

      No damage is being done, IF the lactose bonds with the lactase pill(it is an enzyme that bonds together that enables you body to process the nutrient).

      • Mike

        Not quite – Lactase enzyme breaks lactose down into glucose and galactose. It doesn’t bond to anything, and it does not allow you to process the lactose, it breaks it down into sugars you can process.

  • Tim Omaha

    I suffered with lactose intolerance since my mid-20s and suffered for over 15 years, misdiagnosed with irritable bowel syndrome and inflamed bowel syndrome, all the time not understanding that was products containing lactose that was causing my continual suffering. and for all those years not a single doctor picked up picked up on the fact that it was like toast and tolerance, out of perhaps dozen, which is the staggering testament to the medical communities ignorance or incompetence when it comes to lactose intolerance. I always thought it was the product of stress or some other food that did not sit right with me or a combination of the two.. I myself happened to figure it out one day when the only thing I ate for an entire day was a bowl of cereal contain milk. I was up all night in agony for hours and finally went to the hospital, still not be seen together what was wrong, only that I was experiencing horrible pain and cramps in my stomach and abdominal region for 4-5 hours beforehand. I couldn’t imagine that it was the serial that had me me sick, or more specifically the milk and cereal, because to me I couldn’t imagine that this cereal or milk could somehow have been tainted in a way to make me so ill. Emergency room didn’t pick up on the problem either instead they just help you there and had a drink a very nasty, thick liquid lidocaine from the container which resembled very much an individual coffee creamer surfing and then sent me home with no explanation or diagnosis. It seems all too obvious now, but I soon realized that my beloved milk, that was a staple of my diet and that I had enjoyed all my life a child, through my teenage years and most of my young adulthood had to of been the culprit. figuring out on my own that I was like toast and tolerant one night over one isolated bowl of cereal. Suddenly realizing, in my own the devastation, that all the foods that I had loved all my life I would never be able to eat again. I’ve come to find that while Lactaid (and generics) do greatly ease the symptoms of lactose intolerance they never fully allow me to eat dairy symptom free or without complications. Another unfortunate reality that I have come to find the hard way is that many foods contain lactose as a sweetener but nowhere on the packaging do they list the product contains lactose, except sometimes in the ingredients list. so you may eat something that you would never imagine my contain lactose and then several minutes later find yourself suffering that familiar lactose intolerant agony and symptoms. peanut butter M&M’s was the first product I was in fortunate enough to discover contained lactose with no warning. Since then any products I eat I must check the ingredients list before hand, and I found there is an alarmingly large number of products that contain lactose. Additionally, ordering foods from any restaurant may contain lactose is well, and there is no way to know this beforehand, unless you can somehow query the cooks, waiteres, managers, for every ingredient in every dish served on the menu… as you can imagine this is quite impractical if not impossible to do. Choosing to dine out always makes of lactaid supplement a prerequisite beforehand, before food is ever even ordered.

    • Tash

      Tim,

      That sounds like a harrowing experience. I’m with you in loving dairy. It’s a little heartbreaking not to be able to enjoy our favorite foods, but, at least for me, definitely worth the avoidance.

      I, too, wish that the medical community were more educated about these issues. Nutritional education during medical school is not emphasized in the least. Then again, they have a million other things to learn…

  • Mike

    I’ve been Lactose Intolerant for 30 yrs or so – it progressively got worse, so that while in the beginning I could eat ice cream but not milk, then cheese was still ok, etc – now I need the pills for any amount of milk in any food.

    I need to take up to 8 pills, (Ultra/9000 units) depending on the food. A snickers bar = 4 pills. I cannot eat ice cream or drink normal milk no matter how many pills.

    I can eat cheesy things within reason. 6-8 pills for lasagna, etc.

    I get my pills from Amazon – the Kirkland boxes, that makes them hugely cheaper. 720 pills for $84 = under 12 cents a pill. :)

    • Mike

      Oh yeah, last May I started having symptoms for other things, after a week or two of agony and experimentation, gluten was now my enemy. 3 months of doctors visits and blood tests – I’m Gluten Intolerant, with no signs of celiac or crohns – which is good.

      So now I worry more about gluten than lactose!

      I wish there were a pill that would allow me to eat gluten. :(

      • Tash

        A pill that would allow us to eat gluten. Brilliant!

        • Mike

          Found this a while back when researching the gluten problem.

          http://io9.com/5968164/why-you-should-probably-stop-eating-wheat

          Made me feel a little better, but I still miss my horrible foods – Krispy Kreme, etc.

        • Warstorm Trading

          I wish that were even possible. I don’t think the body produces an enzyme to bond with gluten, like lactase does.

      • Melanie Silver

        im in the same boat. what do you eat and where do you shop. it is so expensive ahd hard sometimes to find food that tastes good and isnt as costly as a new car

        • Mike

          Whole Foods! I hadn’t even been in there before, but now that I cannot find the Lactose-Free Yoplait anywhere, I went into Whole Foods. Most of the lactose free yogurt is nasty. BUT Silk non-dairy soy yogurt is awesome. :) WF also has a large assortment of other GF stuff, like canned/boxed soups, etc. And they have WHEAT FREE SUSHI! In other news, Giant is now carrying gluten free spaghetti in 1lb boxes for $3, way better than the specialty stuff in the GF aisle for $5.

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  • Donna

    Just found out I am lactose intolerant after living with it for 3 years…. trying to figure it out but a little fearful of what it might be. I’m struggling with giving up some of my favorite foods, but at least now I know what to expect if I partake. I bought the pills…. they help somewhat, I suppose, but I have to take so many…. I don’t get why they don’t just make them stronger or larger, even, so i wouldn’t have to take so many. I have a few questions, if anyone can answer…. Can I cook with milk? My husband made pancakes with milk, I had a very small portion with no ill-effects, but I don’t know if that was just luck. I’ve been told I should be able to tolerate goat cheese?

    • Mike

      Hi Donna!

      I found that the 9000 unit “Ultra” pills are good – but how many you need will depend on your tolerances, and you will have to go with experience and ‘testing’.

      The normal strength pills are a waste of money – unless you have very very mild intolerance.

      Anyway – to break it down as to what my doctor told me – it’s simply an enzyme that your body does not make anymore. The pills contain the enzyme, so when you eat the foods with dairy you take pills at the same time. I chew the pills with the first or second bite, kinda yukky but then it’s over and you can enjoy the rest of the meal.

      Some people can just swallow the pills, etc – I found that chewing them made them WAY more effective, but your mileage may vary.

      My doctor also assured me that I really couldn’t overdose, so not to worry on that account.

      One thing I found out the hard way is to read the label on the pills for the secondary inactive ingredients. Some pill makers use mannitol as a binder. It’s also a laxative.

      Cooking does NOT break down the lactose, but if you get the 100% lactose reduced lactaid milk you should be able to cook with it just fine. I have noticed that the whole milk still bothers me but the 2% and nonfat do not.

      And goat cheese is fine – I love the stuff when I can get it. :)

      Yoplait also makes a new lactose-free yogurt – I eat 5-6 every day. Really good!

      • Donna

        Wow, Mike, thanks for your speedy response! Chewing the pills makes sense, I suppose… I can live with that if it’s the trade-off for enjoying a glass of milk every so often. I’m finding I seem to be very intolerant. I stopped buying whole milk, but 2% and skim have the same impact. Even butter (which I understand is fairly low in lactose) sets me off. It’s quite a lifestyle change for me…. I didn’t really think about how much dairy made up my diet, never mind all the non-dairy foods that contain milk or milk solids. It’s certainly sucked all the fun out of grocery shopping, lol. I am, however, really relieved to have figured out the cause… I don’t know HOW I lived dealing with the symptoms before. It was very stressful… I had a mental map of every available restroom for any time I had errands to run. Does anyone know why, pretty much all of a sudden my body stopped producing the enzyme? The Yoplait yogurt isn’t soy, is it? ‘Cos I gave that a shot, I really did, but seriously YEEEEEEEEEEEtch! What about processed cheese?

        • Mike

          Oops – I replied in the wrong place. (Points down)

      • Donna

        Well, I’ll have to try some of those products! And no, I can’t drink milk, but I’m still trying to accept that. Tried the pills with it, but not effective. The reason I didn’t like the lactose free milk was because it was sweet, but that wouldn’t be an issue with chocolate. Thanks Mike for all your info, you’ve been a great help. Are there any forums you can recommend for this issue?

        • Tash

          Thanks Mike for providing so much good information to Donna while I was doing my day job. :)

          Donna— http://www.godairyfree.org/ is a really good website for dairy free resources. Some day I hope that my blog can be as comprehensive as this website!

          Processed cheese is a no-no (at least for me). There are some pretty cool alternatives you can make with cashews. Here is one example if you’re craving some mac n cheese. http://ohsheglows.com/2011/08/18/quick-dirty-5-ingredient-vegan-cheeze-sauce-recipe-challenge/

          Yogurt-wise.. I’ve found that I can tolerate greek yogurt. Soy and almond yogurt are also on the market, but quite pricey. I find that I don’t really enjoy the flavor that much. That being said, there are “crockpot yogurt” recipes that you can make at home to significantly decrease costs. I hope to post one of those recipes on here soon.

          Milk: I LOVE LOVE LOVE almond milk. It is delicious. You can cook with it (unsweetened/unflavored)… believe me I’ve accidentally used the vanilla in savory dishes and it is really yucky. As Mike said, LactAid is also good.

          I think that you’ll need to experiment on yourself and your level of tolerance. We are all different because we have different levels of lactase deficiency. My past 5 years of intolerance have been a constant “dance” of adjusting levels of dairy consumption (ranging from zero tolerance to the occasional indulgence) and choosing when it’s okay to have a stomach ache.

          Hope this helps!

          • Donna

            A wealth of information here, thanks so much. I’ll have to try the almond milk, but is it sweet? that’s what i didn’t care for with the lactose free milk. And does anyone know why a person would become lactose intolerant suddenly? I guess it really is different for everyone… I only ever had mild abdominal discomfort, but constant diarrhea. I’m not sure if I’m just paying more attention now, but since I’ve been trying to abstain from lactose it seems I’m almost more sensitive (I have eaten things accidentally and the reaction is immediate and severe) So many products contain lactose I’m not sure I can avoid it altogether?? Even the packaged lipton Chicken noodle soup I was substituting for my morning coffee with cream has milk solids. Was stomach upset your worst symptom? Why do you think you became slightly more tolerant over time?

            • Mike

              Symptoms I get range from mild distress – “oops, I need to find a bathroom in the next hour or two.” all the way to “BATHROOM NOW MOVEITMOVEITMOVEIT!” usually accompanied with severe cramps.

              Things to watch for on labels : whey, casein, lactobaccillus, as well as the normal names for milk or dairy. Also, some MSG (MonoSodium Glutamate) contains lactose-derived ingredients, so it can cause a reaction.

  • Mike

    As for drinking an actual glass of milk – I can’t do that, maybe you can. The Lactaid milk makes it more likely, so I can actually drink a glass of 2% chocolate lactaid milk. :)

    The yoplait is not soy – it’s just awesome. :)

    Soymilk I don’t like either. not good. Soy ice cream, not so good either.

    Lactaid makes ice cream tho – Butter Pecan is awesome.

    Processed cheese – I need pills, so I usually don’t.

    The lactose free soycheese is kinda icky.

    I do like the lactose free / gluten free macaroni and cheeze (Amy’s Kitchen) – it’s an acquired taste, however. And they are expensive.

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  • George

    I too am lactose intolerant so I understand your reasoning for trying to avoid it. However after doing much research it seems that avoiding dairy products all together could be doing you more long term damage than good. Check out this white paper I came across, I know I know it was funded by the national dairy council so you have to take what they say with a grain of salt but many of the recommendations they site are from outside organizations so it’s worth a read and consideration:

    http://www.nationaldairycouncil.org/SiteCollectionDocuments/health_wellness/lactose_intolerance/Unintended%20Consequences%20of%20Dairy%20Avoidance%20-%202011.pdf

    • Melanie Silver

      many dairy substitutes have more calcium and many leafy green veggies do too.

  • Gigi

    Great article, “sitting across the table from your date!” If I don’t pop the pill and do end up getting lucky – I will really struggle with gas in bed later on!!! Now that is a lot more embarrassing than taking the pill……………….. Argument quashed?

    • Tash

      Touche, Gigi, Touche.

    • Mastro63

      I did have an awkward moment on a date- she noticed me taking a pill just before something cheezy. She laughed about it later- no harm done.

      Believe me- its much more awkward when my guts churn and make monstrous noises in the middle of the night after a pizza with an old girlfriend. She thought I should see a specialist- I told her it was just my lactose intolerance.

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  • Warstorm Trading

    Those are all valid reasons(although a bit naive).
    1. I have been using them for over 5 years, and if you take enough pills, they will work.
    2. If you are concerned about what the person you are dating will think when you have to use a pill to enjoy a meal, what happens when he has to take time to slip on a “raincoat” later in the evening to prevent a baby? See, it really isn’t that awkward.
    3. Expensive? I just bought 120 count bottle for $12(a dime a pill), so at worst I spent fifty cents to enjoy a delivery pizza, WORTH IT.
    4. Consistency, this is the only valid point. If you CHOOSE to be dairy free, good on you. It is a pain in the butt to do, especially when eating out(harder than gluten free, my wife and daughter have to do this one, it isn’t a choice).

    My point is this. If you let little excuses rule your life, then you will spend a lot of time on the outside looking in. Avoid the major dairy things, like ice cream, milk directly, or other heavy cream products(real butter), but have the cheese since it is very low in total lactose amount.

    • Melanie Silver

      dairy free is not always a choice. i have taken up to 4 lactaid pills and they do not get rid of my symptoms completely, they just put off the enevetable. i end up with the problems just about an hour later than i normally would. they are expensive if you have to take 4 or more just to eat and ice cream cone

      • Mastro63

        Well- I avoid ice cream- that’s a whole lot of lactase. But taking a pill with pizza or a meal with some cheese certainly helps me.

  • haha

    what are stupid reasons!!!

  • Josi Verlingieri

    I try to read labels and stick with lactaid free products but there are a few i still eat so popping a lactaid pill really helps me.

  • Evilbeagle

    Just ran across this while looking for my lactase pills online and have to say that while it is not my business how you manage your intolerance, you’d have to kill me before I went dairy free.

    1. The key is finding the pill that works for you. We all have different levels of intolerance, and it takes a bit of time to find the right product and work out how much to take for it to be effective. A bit of trial and error, and I know exactly what I can handle now.
    2. Stop caring what other people think. Taking a pill when out to dinner in exchange for dairy is well worth it. Taking Warstorm Trading’s point a bit further, if you plan to get naked with someone later, you can take a pill at dinnertime.
    3. There are inexpensive pills out there if you look for them.
    4. Your choice to be dairy free or not, but I can’t fathom going that route unless the intolerance is THAT awful that #1 point becomes moot. You are denying yourself needlessly, and that makes life far more awkward than taking a pill when out to dinner if you can’t even eat half of what’s on the menu. Personally, I would rather take a pill at dinner and say it’s for lactose intolerance should anyone bother asking than have to have people alter menus for me.

  • Cassius

    I think they work depending on how severe your intolerance is. I use holland and barretts super lactase enzymes and take 3 with every bowl of cereal. More if I have a pizza. Less for a chocolate bar.

  • DavidLuce

    The bottom line is that it’s your body, therefore your choice. That said, it is interesting to have insight into someone else’s values and thought processes. As for the cheesy date, I recommend you just lock eyes with the person, pop that pill in you mouth, give a little Mona Lisa smile and let ‘em wonder.

    Now, back to my research on lactase supplements…

  • Eileen

    Hi, I am new to knowing that I am lactose intolerant, and I am trying to do research to figure everything out. I read this article because I have been taking Lactaid pills whenever I eat dairy, but sometimes it doesn’t seem to work, and the information found here and in the comments has been a big help to me. It is helping me understand everything a bit better.

    I was having terrible symptoms with lots of pain and urgency, and trying desperately to figure out what was going on. I am also anemic, and I went to a GI and he scoped me up and down, and didn’t find a thing going on – just a little bit of inflammation. So, then, I swallowed a camera, but nothing was found, no evidence of Celiac or anything similar – which I thought was maybe the reason for my abdominal distress, or maybe Crohn’s Disease. Anyway, he said I must just have IBS. I really didn’t think IBS was causing me all these problems!

    So, I continued in my misery, until a friend, who is a nurse, said, “have you thought about lactose intolerance?” I never considered lactose intolerance to be an option because I have eaten dairy my whole life and I thought lactose intolerance was something you were born with. I didn’t realize that it can develop as you get older. So, I read up on it and started avoiding dairy or taking Lactaid pills whenever I ate dairy, and I haven’t had one of those bad attacks since then! It has been almost 3 months now, so I know I am on the right track. The only thing is, when I eat some things (and take a pill), I still have some symptoms – just not to the horrible degree that I had them before. So I started wondering if I needed to take more, or do they really work that well, etc.

    I said all of that to say that all of this information is so helpful to me! Now I know that I may need to take more pills when eating some things, and I should just totally avoid other things – like dairy queen small ice cream cones. I ate one yesterday with a Lactaid Fast Act pill, and within 30 minutes I was having symptoms. Thanks again for all the info!

    • Mastro63

      That’s certainly a long way to find out. Mine was straight forward. Someone warned me in college that that was when people developed intolerance- then I started lifting weights and taking whey powder. OMG!- it was terrible- but so obvious to me what happened.

      They even remove lactase from whey powder now- it most have horrified a lot of lifters.

    • LS

      Hey, I realize this post was quite a while back, but I thought I’d weigh in anyway. I wish someone had told me years ago what I’m about to tell you. How much lactaid (or alternate lactase supplement) you need to take depends on a lot of factors, and you may not be taking enough of it to counteract the symptoms. You should check out this site: http://www.stevecarper.com/li/lactase.htm, which has a lot of good information you should see. I also just posted on this article (http://www.dairyfreechick.com/lactase-pills/), which may ring some bells for you.

  • NileJasmine

    I’m beginning to accept that I may have a huge lactose intolerance. Neither the Lacteeze or Lactaid brands have made much of a difference, but now that I’m reading up on the intolerance being on a spectrum, I’m curious to try some lactase pills. That said, I’ve been avoiding dairy for the past several months (goat’s milk doesn’t help much either), and it truly is the best guard against feeling like shit all the time. I’d rather live healthy and specify a non-dairy meal at the restaurant, instead of living in the constant fear of letting loose a stink-bomb. Consuming dairy (yes, even indulging in a wonderfully gooey 3-cheese pizza or ice cream out) just isn’t worth it.

  • Mastro63

    I have a friend who is seriously lactose intolerance. He is also a baker. He takes pills with everything- his point is that milk is in LOTS of things- cooks are always adding milk, cream, butter or whey to recipes.

    I try to take them as often as possible- it has cut back on my discomfort.

  • disqus_asHFz6DB07

    This really strikes home with me. I can’t tolerate ANY amount of lactose (which is naturally present in some amount in even breads, meats, and most any snack food) naturally. It costs about $80 per month for the amount of lactaid to allow me a normal diet. For every one slice of cheese, it takes 6 lactaids to deal with the symptoms. When I eat a bowl of mac and cheese or pasta with alfredo sauce, I take 12-18 pills. I take the things 2-3 at a time and I’m usually still popping pills when my dining companions are a good way through their meals. People I eat with regularly get it, but it’s embarrassing to have to explain taking a handfull of pills to coworkers, and it’s uncomfortable having a pile of pill wrappers sitting at the table until the waitstaff comes to take them away, wondering what kind of junkie I am. Because the symptoms are not polite conversation, I detest the moment I realize I have to explain myself. But thanks to the relative anonymity of the internet, I’m going to explain in glorious detail for those of you that think it’s just a bit of gas.

    Oh, it starts out with gas. Absolutely foul, noxious, something-died-in-my-ass-a-week-ago gas. This is accompanied by cramping so painful it causes intense sweating and shaking. I went through a tonsillectomy recovery in my 20′s with no pain medication (allergic), and I’m not kidding or exaggerating about the level of pain this lactose-cramping causes. The next symptom is white-hot acid shooting out of my ass as my digestive system screams “ABORT! ABORT!” Hopefully I’ve made it to a toilet in time. God help me if this has happened at work and someone I may actually have to face again wants to take a stall near me. Hell, god help anyone within earshot or breathing distance, because it is a noisy and foul-smelling process. I can expect to spend the next half-hour in there, and several more trips just as pained and frantic over the next half-day. The gas will linger another half-day after that, but luckily the cramping will have stopped around the same time as the bathroom trips.

    Oh, did I mention that there’s no way to know if you’ve eaten too much lactose with too little lactaid until it hits anywhere from 5 minutes to several hours after eating something containing lactose? And if you’re highly lactose-intolerant like me, you get to spend every single meal conscious of that.

    But I still do it, because the two years I spent lactose-free (before I realized I couldn’t overdose on lactaid) were miserable. Every time I went out to eat with friends, I had to pick something I didn’t like off the menu and watch (and smell) as they got to eat whatever they wanted. Even eating alone sucked because practically nothing that tastes good is lactose-free. While the grocery stores all stock lactose-free milk, there’s only one restaurant in town and a crappy hippie grocery store that have alternate cheese, whipped cream, cream cheese, etc. lactose-free products. And SHOCKINGLY, most of them taste awful. (Okay, the ice cream is actually really freaking good, and the butter is usually okay, but that’s it.)

    I’m not saying “Screw cancer, cure lactose-intolerance!”, but it irks me when people say “just avoid ice cream” or “nobody cares if you pop a pill with your meal”, or “it’s just a bit of gas”. It’s ignorant and makes light of the everyday suck that is lactose-intolerance.

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  • http://alinux.tv/ aLinuxTV

    They are super expensive as I’ve just bought some.. I’ve never been sick from Milk or Ice cream (those actually calm my stomach) but store bought Pizza (perhaps gluten) and recently I switched from Whey Isolate to Whey Concentrate ..omg.. I almost died.. I remember years ago trying Whey Concentrate and feeling super nauseous .. then I notice the Whey brand I take now is hard to find so I tried a new one and no way.. felt so sick for the entire day!!! like it wouldn’t go away after few hours .. so i ran to the Pharmacy and asked for Lactaid .. popped 4 of them.. never felt better but the next day I felt fine.. and I took the Whey with one Lactaid.. and wow.. felt great.. I even think they burn fat cause I’m missing that enzyme but I’m not sticking with them.. cause who knows in long run they might make us sicker so I’ll find a new brand of Whey Isolate which has (no lactose) and carry on.. but I know how you feel. You seem to have it a lot worse than myself. I just felt like throwing up all day long / even dizzy but no diarhrea at all.. but holy cow.. I can barely eat lots of foods so I eat same thing everyday and do great until this one change in Whey almost did me in :) Hope you’re doing good. Avoidance is good but always have Lactaid on hand – I am.. just in case.. in fact I just bought another supplement for cheaper $12 which has Lactaid in it plus probiotics and other digestive enzymes like Bromelain (comes from pineapple) .. Hope it helps when I eat something that doesn’t agree with me as usual :)

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